Baltimore County school board expected to give employees raise when it votes on budget Tuesday night

Baltimore County’s school board is expected to approve a spending plan Tuesday night that includes pay raises for employees, a move that is likely to strain an already tight county budget. “We stand united in our desire to prioritize investing in our employees,” School Board Chair Kathleen Causey said in a statement Monday. Causey said the board intends to give teachers both their step increases and a cost-of-living increase, but may cut technology, travel and administrative budgets. (Balt. Sun)

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Dozens of Hopkins faculty members sign letter opposing private police force

More than 60 Johns Hopkins University faculty members have signed a letter in opposition to proposed state legislation that authorizes the school to create a campus police force. The faculty members wrote that a police force employed by the university would be “undemocratic” and “antagonistic” with Baltimore’s nonwhite population. The introduction of new armed police officers, they wrote, could pose an increased safety risk and “inevitably amplify the climate of fear and justify their roles by citing stops, arrests, and detainments.” (Wash. Post)

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'Students want to have a say,' says Anne Arundel school board's youngest-ever vice president

Baltimore schools' vocational programs fail to live up to promise, report says

Baltimore’s school system has long described its vocational programs — which can allow students to earn industry-recognized certifications along with a high school diploma — as a clear path to solid employment. They celebrate teenagers who learn to style hair, fix cars and build furniture while still in school. But in reality, a new report says, these Career and Technical Education — or CTE — programs don’t live up to their promise. (Balt. Sun)

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Students Fight To Bring Clean Energy To Maryland

Students from all over Maryland hit Annapolis by storm Monday to fight for laws to protect the environment. The students believe that clean energy will bring jobs and money to Maryland. The energy was contagious at the House of Delegates in Annapolis. Young advocates are supporting the Maryland Clean Energy Jobs Act and they said that it’s now or never to change the way we see our environment. (WJZ-CBS)

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Two moms, one invitation to Mother’s Day tea. Was the school being fair?

The instructions on the invitation for the Mother’s Day tea party were explicit. “One (1) Mother or Mother Figure per child.” Annissia Hawkins and her ex-wife, Tiana, were stunned. They tried to give National Christian Academy, the Maryland private school their son had attended for three years, the benefit of the doubt. After all, they said, the teachers and other parents were always welcoming. But they couldn’t help wondering whether their “same-gender loving family” was being singled out. (Wash. Post)

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Aldermen brainstorm ways to help reduce school crowding

From 2008 to 2017, the percentage of students at Hillcrest Elementary in the city of Frederick jumped from 89 percent capacity to 135 percent. But within that time, hardly any new homes were built in the area that filters students into the school. That phenomenon, mixed with a laundry list of other factors that go into the detailed and intricate schools portion of the city’s Adequate Public Facilities Ordinance, is the reason why developers say a simple solution to improving the legislation does not exist. (News Post)

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Anne Arundel County can bypass the tax cap to raise education funds

Anne Arundel County’s tax cap is not impenetrable. In fact, it is quite permeable as a law tucked into the Maryland Code allows counties to bypass their tax caps as long as the money raised is strictly related to education spending. Prince George’s and Talbot counties have taken advantage of the option, though residents in those counties challenged those decisions. County Executive Steuart Pittman has talked often about his desire to boost education funding. Bypassing the tax cap could raise money to pay for a variety of education needs, but it is likely to anger voters as the cap was implemented in 1994 by referendum vote. (Balt. Sun)

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