Johns Hopkins launching program to help working adults learn to code

Johns Hopkins University's engineering school is launching a new training program aimed at teaching working adults how to code, and filling open jobs in the local tech industry. The Whiting School of Engineering is working in collaboration with edtech firm Trilogy Education Services to run the new coding boot camp. The 24-week, part-time program will be geared toward working professionals who may be looking to pursue new job opportunities in tech, and teach them the coding skills necessary to become web developers. The first cohort is expected to have about 25 participants and will begin September 24, with additional cohorts starting quarterly. (Balt. Bus. Journal)

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Council Member Pitches Bethesda or Silver Spring USM Campus

A Montgomery County Council member wants to bring a University System of Maryland (USM) campus to downtown Bethesda or Silver Spring to attract more technology companies to the county. Council member Hans Riemer said Tuesday during a forum on the future of Bethesda that he would like the university system to build another campus in the county. The University System of Maryland already operates The Universities at Shady Grove (USG) in the Rockville area. USG is a satellite USM campus, offering undergraduate and graduate degree programs from nine USM schools. This fall, USG will open a new 220,000-square-foot Biomedical Sciences and Engineering building. (Bethesda)

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Study Finds Possible Link Between Election & Increase In Preterm Births Among Latinas

A new study found there was an increase in pre-term births among Latina mothers in the nine months after the November 2016 election of Donald Trump as president. The research findings were published Friday in the JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association) Network Open, and it was led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. The study used data compiled by the Centers for Disease Control, in a period from November 2016 until July 2017. The data found there was roughly 3.5-percent more preterm births than were projected. (WBAL-Radio)

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Thousands of Baltimore students have lacked access to Advanced Placement. That’s about to change

Students at Baltimore Polytechnic Institute, the top-rated public high school in the city, can enroll in more than two dozen Advanced Placement courses. They’re able to do accelerated work in history and physics and chemistry and English, with the potential to earn college credit in those subjects should they pass a final exam. But access to AP classes is wildly uneven across the city. Nine traditional high schools didn’t offer any of these courses last year, district documents show, and five schools had just one. That’s changing. The district is embarking on a three-year plan with the goal of having six AP classes, including a research capstone, offered at every high school in the city. (Balt. Sun)

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Baltimore County Schools, Libraries Team Up With No Kid Goes Hungry To Provide Free Meals For Kids

A collaboration between Baltimore County Public Schools, the library system and No Kid Goes Hungry is making sure every kid has something to eat this summer. The organizations are teaming up to give kids across the county free, nutritious food every day. “We’re really excited to fill this gap that kids may have — getting a healthy meal during the summertime,” said Erica Palmasisano with the Baltimore County Public Library system. Lunch is provided on weekdays at nine county libraries for children under 18. (WJZ-TV)

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An educational experience that’s out of this world - literally

Rockets, planets and robots are just a few things kids got to see at Apollopalooza Saturday at the Earth and Space Science Laboratory in Frederick. Apollopalooza was a special event held this year, in partnership with Frederick County Public Libraries and Frederick County Public Schools, to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the moon landing. Close to 1,000 people attended the event that included planetarium shows, arts and crafts, a model rocket launch and hands-on activities to help kids learn about space. “I want kids to feel excited and energized by the opportunity that there’s still so much out there that we don’t know about,” said Adam Farbman, co-director of the Earth and Space Science Laboratory. (News-Post)

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'We are a village’: A new youth center represents hope for the future in West Baltimore

In the Rosemont neighborhood of Baltimore, a video plays on a flat-screen television on the second floor of a church, at first displaying images of children and young adults in distress over ominous music. It’s the ribbon cutting for the Agape Youth Center at the John Wesley United Methodist Church, a yearlong project to renovate the second floor of the church into a viable youth center with spaces for a library, games and movies. But for all the playful imagery the scene evokes — orange and blue walls line the center while kids jockey for position on the couches in front of the television — those who have spent the past year getting it open say it’s about a serious battle in Baltimore. (Balt. Sun)

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Summer school is hot at community colleges

Towson University student Christelle Etienne isn’t whiling away these long, lazy days of summer lounging by the pool or hanging out with friends from high school. Instead, she’s sitting in a classroom at Montgomery College in suburban Maryland taking classes in anatomy and physiology. A pre-nursing and foreign language major with a double minor, Etienne is hoping the extra work will keep her on schedule to earn her bachelor’s degree. That’s something only 42 percent of first-time, full-time college students manage to do, according to the U.S. Education Department. And the longer students take to finish, the more they wind up paying. (Wash. Post)

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