Daily Times Editorial Board endorses Ben Cardin for U.S. Senate

Ben Cardin is running for a third six-year term representing Maryland in the U.S. Senate. His opponent is a Towson University political science professor, Tony Campbell. As a Democrat, Cardin holds many predictable positions on issues of concern to Marylanders, including health care, the environment and the Chesapeake Bay. His opponent, Tony Campbell, likewise holds reliably Republican views on various issues: state versus federal government roles, freedom of the press, gun ownership and job creation. (Daily Times)

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The Post’s endorsements for attorney general in Maryland and D.C.

In Maryland and the District, incumbent attorneys general Brian E. Frosh and Karl A. Racine, both Democrats, have used their first terms to make an impact, and a highly positive one. They deserve reelection. Mr. Frosh, a well-regarded state lawmaker for 28 years before winning his current job in 2014, has been an activist attorney general. Having sought and won legislative authority to sue the federal government without prior approval from the governor or General Assembly, in 2017, he has used that power aggressively to challenge Trump administration policies, often in concert with other Democratic attorneys general. (Wash. Post)

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Civilian review board: Baltimore police undermining oversight efforts

At a recent public hearing on the Baltimore Police Department’s compliance with the city’s consent decree with the federal government, City Solicitor Andre Davis disclosed information about a dispute that has unfortunately arisen between us, the Civilian Review Board, and one of the agencies that we oversee — the Baltimore Police Department (BPD). Mr. Davis not only shared information about the dispute but also his impressions and opinions of it. Because this important matter has now been made public, we wish to ensure that the public is accurately informed. (Balt. Sun)

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Donald C. Fry: Baltimore’s other crisis

If you happen to be one of the approximately 24,000 motorists who travel across the Hanover Street Bridge in south Baltimore each day, you are driving on a structure that is standing on borrowed time. The reason: The bridge, built in 1900 and owned by Baltimore City, is what civil engineers deem “structurally deficient.” That doesn’t sound good, and it’s not. Costs to reconstruct it are estimated at $150 million. Baltimore city doesn’t have that kind of money in its transportation budget, so instead it repaved the bridge at a cost of $400,000. Improved, yes, but not the needed solution. (Daily Record)

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Baltimore's squeegee dilemma

People who drive through downtown Baltimore report a wide variety of experiences with the squeegee kids who try to make money by cleaning windshields at traffic lights. Some people are happy to give them a dollar or two, and to exchange a few words as they pass by. Some people habitually wave them off without incident. Others say they have found the kids (or at least some of them) to be uncomfortably persistent, that they have to gesticulate and yell to get them to move on. At the extreme end, some drivers report frightening confrontations — broken windshields, attempted robberies. (Balt. Sun)

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Brian Griffiths: Yes and no, a look at Maryland ballot questions

There are two Constitutional Amendments on the ballot this year that require your attention as a vote. The first is Question 1, which will create a lockbox for casino revenues that will be directed towards public education. The idea of a lockbox for casino revenues has been around since the beginning. Back when slots were first reintroduced by then-Gov. Martin O’Malley, gambling was sold as something that would directly benefit education by making more money available for public schools. Casino revenue was to be placed in the Education Trust Fund. Of course, it never was that way because O’Malley and legislative Democrats constantly raided the Education Trust Fund to cover general fund deficits and for spending on other programs. (Capital)

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Jimmy DeButts: Schuh, Pittman debate was high-scoring affair but no knockout blow was delivered

The Steve Schuh-Steuart Pittman County Executive debate didn’t deliver a decisive winner, but the encounter played out like a competitive football game. Meeting at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts Thursday, the candidates traded barbs, connected on a few momentum-swinging retorts and whiffed on game-ending Hail Mary attempts. Here’s a breakdown of the two-hour debate. (Capital)

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Dan Rodricks: Nobody asked me, but doesn't the Baltimore FOP have more to worry about than an SNL sketch?

Nobody asked me, but, if I was Lorne Michaels, the creator and producer of “Saturday Night Live,” I might write back to Lt. Gene Ryan, the president of the Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 3, to say this: Do you really have time to be complaining about a late-night comedy sketch? Didn’t I read somewhere that Baltimore is one of the most violent cities in America? Didn’t your acting commissioner just pull 230 police officers off administrative duties for patrol work to combat another horrible spike in violence? Doesn’t the B in BPD stand for beleaguered? (Balt. Sun)

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