Editorial: Maryland should not hold the November election on pre-pandemic terms

In a memorandum sent to Gov. Larry Hogan and legislative leaders just two weeks ago, the head of a bipartisan group representing election administrators statewide pleaded for the upcoming general election to be conducted “primarily” by mail. The reasoning presented by David Garreis, president of the Maryland Association of Election Officials, was straightforward: During the COVID-19 pandemic, it can’t be done safely otherwise. (Balt Sun)

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Williams-Brinkley: Racism is a public health crisis. We need to address it now

If you are a Black woman in America, you are 2.5 times more likely to die during or after childbirth than a white woman, and 40 percent more likely to die from breast cancer. You have higher rates of diabetes, hypertension and heart disease. If you are diagnosed with COVID-19, these preexisting health conditions make you more likely to be hospitalized and die from the virus. Similar disparities exist for other groups, especially the Latinx community. (Daily Record)

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Pinsky: Governor Hogan’s wrong choice for the November election

What is the best path to running a successful election in Maryland this November? Every single one of Maryland’s local election boards gave the same answer to this question before Gov. Hogan announced his election plan for the state Wednesday. These 24 local boards recommended that the state send ballots to all voters and supplement mail balloting with walk-up voting locations — the same hybrid recommendation that Maryland’s Senate president and I gave the state election board and governor weeks ago. (Balt Sun)

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Viewpoint: Our young adults want to change the world. Let's give them the opportunity.

As I write this, our nation’s youth are participating in protests in the wake of the tragic deaths of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor at the hands of law enforcement, crying out for justice and systemic change. Despite facing an uncertain job market, many of the United States' college graduates are eager to accept positions that will help our country and its people recover from the novel coronavirus pandemic. (Balt Bus Journal)

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Hakakian: We immigrants owe a great debt to the African American struggle for equality

A few days after I arrived as a refugee in America in 1985, when I was 18, relatives already living here came to take me sightseeing. My mother and I had resettled in New York, and naturally my relatives wanted to show me the Statue of Liberty and the Empire State Building. Instead, I wanted to see Harlem. I had come of age in revolutionary Iran and was eager to see the America that the revolutionaries had peddled to my generation. (Wash Post)

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Marriage: Creating hurdles for international students only hurts the U.S.

Following fast on the heels of last month’s ban of H1B visas that has crippled our ability to recruit and keep the best talent from abroad, the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) has also announced that international students will be unwelcome in the U.S. if they are enrolled in universities and colleges that choose for COVID-19 safety reasons to host courses exclusively online. The ICE student ban makes no sense from the perspective of public health, the economy, American competitiveness and basic decency. (Balt Sun)

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Viewpoint: It takes a village to reopen child care

As the District looks toward Phase 3 of reopening, child care centers across D.C. are struggling. As the executive director of Bright Beginnings Inc., a nonprofit organization that operates early childhood and family learning centers for children and families experiencing homelessness in the backdrop of Washington, D.C., I not only implore that local, state and federal government remain committed to investing in early childhood education as we transition to our new normal, but to also double-down on this country’s investment in our youngest children and their families. (Balt Bus Journal)

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Editorial: Reopening our courts

Asymptomatic “super-spreaders” and inadequate testing to detect them. Airborne viral microbes and antiquated ventilation systems. Jury rooms and trial tables too small to permit social distancing. Conferences up at the bench with lawyers and court personnel huddled together. Crowded public hallways, bathrooms and elevators. These are just some of the nightmarish logistical challenges facing our bench and bar on the journey to reopening the court system. (Daily Record)

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