Rodricks: T.J. Smith, running for mayor, wants to ‘shrink the pool’ of violent offenders in Baltimore

Get him rolling and T.J. Smith hardly takes a breath when he talks about crime, its effect on the quality of life in Baltimore, and what he would do about it. He’s running for mayor of his hometown in April’s primary, bringing a kind of breathless urgency to a candidacy built more on name and face recognition than on experience in government. (Balt. Sun)

Read Full Article

Jankowicz: The real impeachment bombshell? How to pronounce ‘Kyiv.’

As the first public impeachment hearings transfixed the country last week with revelations on a recalled ambassador and quid pro quos, America’s collective mind was blown by another bombshell. “Wait so Kiev is pronounced KEEVE (rhymes with Steve)?!?,” star political forecaster Nate Silver wondered as many others online marveled that they had been pronouncing the Ukrainian capital wrong their whole lives. (Wash. Post)

Read Full Article

Kristol & Petraeus: Trump’s ill-advised pardons will damage Americans’ view of the military

“I would just say there is one misperception of our veterans and that is they are somehow damaged goods. I don’t buy it.” So said retired Marine Corps general Jim Mattis during remarks at the Marines’ Memorial Club in San Francisco in 2014. The line strikes a chord with us, as we’re sure it would with the great majority of veterans with whom we served. (Wash. Post)

Read Full Article

Milbank: Republicans have a new enemy: Truth itself

At its core, President Trump’s defense in these impeachment proceedings is not a dispute over the facts of the case, the credibility of the witnesses or the motives of Democrats. It is a bid to discredit the truth itself. The Ukraine escapade began, in large part, because Trump pursued a conspiracy theory that Ukraine had interfered in the 2016 election to bring about his defeat, a false notion spread by Vladimir ­Putin and ultimately — with the help of Rudy Giuliani and others — embraced by the president himself. (Wash. Post)


Read Full Article

EDITORIAL: Medicare For All takeover of U.S. health care hotly contested at Democratic debate

Just as it had been in each of the four previous 2020 Democratic presidential debates, the proposed Medicare For All takeover of the nation’s health care and health insurance systems was hotly contested in their fifth face-off Wednesday night in Atlanta. Sens. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and Bernie Sanders of Vermont continue their dangerously misguided push for the abolition of private insurance and for forcing all Americans into a one-size-fits-all federal government-run plan with a price tag estimated at a mind-boggling $52 trillion over 10 years. (Wash. Times)

Read Full Article

Marcus: The Kavanaugh vote: Two friends, one judge and a fight for the Senate and Supreme Court

Brett M. Kavanaugh, President Trump’s nominee to replace retiring Supreme Court Justice Anthony M. Kennedy, was never going to be confirmed by a wide or comfortable margin. The closely divided Senate, the still-bitter legacy of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s decision to block the nomination of Merrick Garland and the once-in-a-generation chance to cement a conservative majority for decades to come — all of these factors augured a nominee who would not win more than a few Democratic votes. (Wash. Post)

Read Full Article

Editorial: Baltimore deserved better than Mayor Pugh even before the indictment

When The Baltimore Sun broke news this spring that Mayor Catherine Pugh had sold hundreds of thousands of dollars-worth of her poorly written Healthy Holly children’s books to the University of Maryland Medical System, on whose board she sat, she dismissed questions as part of a “witch hunt” and suggested she was an open book with nothing to hide. But as more such sales were revealed and allegations of self-dealing made, she resigned from the board and, later, her mayoral position. (Balt. Sun)

Read Full Article

Rodricks: Mayor’s obtuse comment about Baltimore murders should heighten interest in other candidates

It is difficult to think of a statement by a Baltimore mayor that could be more obtuse: “I’m not committing the murders, and that’s what people need to understand. How can you fault leadership? This has been five years of 300-plus murders. I don’t see it as a lack of leadership.” That was Jack Young during his press conference last week. With city violence reaching its annual crescendo, the mayor seemed to be saying: “Don’t blame me, and don’t look to me for answers.” It’s as if he considers the high rate of violence a naturally occurring phenomenon, like a drought, beyond human control. (Balt. Sun)

Read Full Article