EDITORIAL: BMA could do even more to diversify its collection

The Baltimore Museum of Art made a big splash with news of its decision to buy only works of art by women for an entire year. Exhibits created by women are woefully underrepresented at the Wyman Park museum, making up just 4% of the 95,000 artworks in the permanent collection. It is far past time that was corrected. The bold way the BMA has chosen to attack the issue could be a model for other museums, and officials say they hope to inspire others. (Balt. Sun)

 

Read Full Article

EDITORIAL: Republicans’ defense of Trump is full of holes

The first week of impeachment hearings produced powerful testimony about President Trump’s pressure on Ukraine to investigate his political opponents, but also a number of defensive arguments by Republicans. Unfortunately for Mr. Trump, none of them is consistent with the facts. Here’s a review of the various excuses and their flaws. (Wash. Post)

Read Full Article

Kagan: Republicans are pushing the U.S. to accept quid pro quo as the new normal

Washington, D.C., March 2, 2024. Attorney General Kamala D. Harris traveled to London last week to meet with top advisers to British Prime Minister Jeremy Corbyn, it has been learned. The topic? Allegations of questionable behavior by Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.) while traveling overseas in 2021. According to White House sources, British intelligence picked up snippets of phone conversations that they claim could be damaging to the senator, who is running for the Republican presidential nomination and polling second in most of next week’s Super Tuesday primaries. (Wash. Post)

Read Full Article

Capehart: Diversity training fails because companies are doing it wrong

Diversity training. A lot of employees go through it. A lot of companies make their employees go through it. But in her book, “Diversity Inc: The Failed Promise of a Billion-Dollar Business.” Pamela Newkirk argues that not only is most diversity training done wrong, it can also make things worse at companies and for their employees — in every profession. To be sure, diversity training is just the start of the larger enterprise explored in Newkirk’s book. (Wash. Post)

Read Full Article

Emanuel: If they’re not true to their history, Democrats risk squandering a rare opportunity

Credit where credit is due: Sens. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) and Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) have done a masterful job baiting the rest of the field into fighting this campaign on their turf. Many voters inevitably presume today that redistribution of wealth is the Democratic Party’s animating creed. But that’s simply not true to history: Since the New Deal, Democrats have thrived when championing ideas moored in the belief that rights come with responsibilities and that benefits are earned through work. (Wash. Post)

Read Full Article

Rampell: Trump and Republicans are on the hunt for Real Crimes

For a party that prides itself on being the champion of law and order, the GOP has some peculiar ideas about crime. Nothing President Trump does, it turns out, is a crime, let alone a “high” one. That’s not only because some crimes are not crimes, according to both Trump and his personal lawyer Rudolph W. Giuliani. It is also not only because a sitting president is supposedly immune from criminal prosecution — including for shooting someone on Fifth Avenue, per another Trump lawyer. (Wash. Post)

Read Full Article

EDITORIAL: Beijing eroded Hong Kong's freedoms, now protesters want self-determination

The Chinese government may have succeeded in ensuring that the protests wracking Hong Kong have not spread outwards onto the Mainland. But one thing is for certain: Many months into the anti-Beijing demonstrations that have riled the capitalist entrepot, Beijing has manifestly failed to pacify Hong Kong. Indeed, if nothing else, the protests against Communist rule appear only to be gaining in intensity, if not size. (Wash. Times)

Read Full Article

Santa Clarita demonstrates (once again) the folly of too-easy access to guns

Sixteen seconds. That’s all it took for a 16-year-old to pull out a handgun from his backpack in his high school quad and kill two students, wound three others and shoot himself in the head. Sixteen seconds. It was over in less time than it takes to read a weather report, wash your hands or prepare a bowl of breakfast cereal. In Santa Clarita, Calif., they are mourning the terrible consequences of Thursday’s attack and are doubtless asking themselves the question that everyone asks after yet another mass shooting in a nation that leads the world in senseless mass shootings: Why? (Balt. Sun)

Read Full Article