New micropigmentation studio opens in Frederick

Tony Smith recently opened ScalpDMV to offer micropigmentation services. He recently spoke with the News-Post about why he opened the salon and how his services can help people. What made you want to open a micropigmentation salon? I am bald headed myself and I wear hats a lot of the time. Sometimes I get self- conscious about it and I thought about how other people feel, especially people with cancer, alopecia or have scars on their head. I thought it was a good way to give people their confidence back. What’s your background in the industry? I’ve been in the barber industry for 35 years. (News-Post)

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Planning Board Approves Development of 225 Apartment Units in Rockville

A development proposal for 225 multifamily units along Twinbrook Parkway in Rockville received preliminary approval from the Montgomery County Planning Board on Thursday. The project, at 12500 Ardennes Ave., bordered to the east by the parkway, includes a seven-story building, public open space and a parking garage. Developer Ardennes Partners LLC has proposed that 15% of the apartment units be designated as affordable housing, as mandated by county law. Another 10% would be “workforce housing,” intended to be affordable to households with incomes too high to be eligible to participate in the county’s affordable housing program. (Bethesda)

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Local brewery hosts suicide prevention fundraiser

Those sipping beers at Rockwell Brewery Sunday afternoon were also supporting a national foundation. The brewery partnered with the local chapter of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP) for an “Out of Darkness” fundraiser event. Ten percent of the profits of every beer sold were donated to the AFSP. Don and Donna Freitag walked into Rockwell not knowing about the fundraiser but were glad to lend their support. “We always like to support local causes,” Donna said. “[And] it seems like it’s [suicide] a sad thing that’s happening more often than not these days and no one is protected from it at any age group or demographic, especially law enforcement or military which breaks our heart.” (News-Post)

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Maryland loses 7,000 jobs in June despite gains nationally

Maryland lost 7,000 jobs in June, the second straight month the state saw a decline. Decreases were broad-based across the private sector. The manufacturing industry was the only one to see an increase after gaining 1,500 jobs during the month, according to data released Friday by the U.S. Department of Labor. The public sector also added 1,000 jobs. The biggest decline happened in education and health services, which lost 3,500 jobs. Leisure and hospitality also lost 2,300 jobs.  Both the construction industry and professional and business services each lost 700 jobs. Trade, transportation and utilities decreased by 400 positions and financial activities decreased by 100. (Balt. Bus. Journal)

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Md. planning commission OKs logistics center, thought to be Amazon fulfillment center, in Prince George’s Co.

A plan to build a 4-million-square-foot warehouse — believed by neighbors to be an Amazon fulfillment center — in Westphalia, a young community in Prince George’s County, Maryland, just took a step forward. The Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission Thursday night approved an addition to Westphalia Town Center in Upper Marlboro with conditions relating to architecture, sound walls and landscaping. All indications show that the planned center along Maryland Route 4 at Melwood Road near the Capital Beltway will be an Amazon fulfillment center, but because of a nondisclosure agreement, that has not been confirmed. (WTOP)

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Demonstrators protest Johns Hopkins Hospital suing poor patients

Joined by members of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, national union leaders staged a noisy — and musical — rally Saturday calling on Johns Hopkins Hospital to stop suing low-income patients to collect debt. A crowd of a few hundred chanted “Shame!” and some people waved signs reading “Hey Hopkins. Stop Suing Patients & Families.” The rally — held on a sweltering afternoon outside the hospital — also promoted the efforts of a group of Hopkins nurses to unionize. “It may be 100 degrees out there, but we’re just getting started,” AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka shouted from an outdoor stage. “Nurses are the most trusted public servants in our nation, and they deserve a voice on the job.” (Balt. Sun)

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Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture gets $1M investment

U.S. Bank on Tuesday announced a five-year $1 million investment with the Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture. This investment makes Minneapolis-based U.S. Bank a member of the Corporate Leadership Council, a group of corporate donors committed to diversity, equity and inclusion. "At U.S. Bank, we are committed to diversity, equity and inclusion and the arts — which brings us closer together and strengthens our communities," said U.S. Bancorp (NYSE: USB) Chairman, President and CEO Andy Cecere said in a statement. (Balt. Bus. Journal)

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$3.2M award, cut costs may not save Baltimore Symphony

An audit says a possible infusion of $3.2 million in state funds and savings from a shortened season may not be enough to save the cash-strapped Baltimore Symphony Orchestra. The Baltimore Sun reports the SC&H Group audit released Tuesday says both methods would only temporarily help BSO unless additional revenues streams are established. It says it’s unclear if the orchestra will survive the year. (WTOP)

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