Amid crab worker shortage, Maryland officials approve $375,000 to boost marketing of local seafood

The Maryland Board of Public Works on Wednesday granted a state seafood marketing campaign an extra $375,000 to help promote the crab industry as it grapples with a shortage of immigrant workers. Eastern Shore crab houses, where crustaceans are picked for the meat sold in grocery stores and restaurants, are without about 35 percent of their usual work force after many failed to get necessary guest worker visas. The visas were awarded by a lottery for the first time this year, amid high demand for foreign labor from a variety of seasonal industries. (Balt. Sun)

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Johns Hopkins among institutions embracing 'rapid autopsies'

Hopkins is at the forefront of a burgeoning movement of medical institutions embracing “rapid autopsies” — a procedure ideally conducted within six hours of a person’s death, before tissue start to significantly degrade. Dr. Jody Hooper, director of the Legacy Gift Rapid Autopsy program at Johns Hopkins, said such autopsies are performed most often on cancer patients. The procedure allows doctors to collect wide-ranging tissue samples from throughout the body and learn as much as possible about the disease that killed their patient. Researchers set out to gather still-living cancer cells and use them to analyze the ways the tumor was responding to treatment. (Balt. Sun)

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Ground broken for next apartment building in the transit-oriented Owings Mills project

Construction has started on a new seven-story apartment building in the Metro Centre in Owings Mills, bringing the total number of apartments clustered there at 350. The 114-unit building, called The Met at Metro Centre, is part of a massive transit-oriented development there offering residents access to the Baltimore Metro on site and a walkable neighborhood around the transportation hub. It’s also near Interstate 795. Developed by David S. Brown Enterprises, the overall project — with housing, retail and office space — has been in the works for years and has overcome snags and county council infighting. (Balt. Sun)

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Medical marijuana dispensary opens in Mount Vernon, co-owned by Hopkins medical professor

A medical marijuana dispensary co-owned by an adjunct professor of medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine has opened in Mount Vernon. The ReLeaf Medical Cannabis Dispensary, in the 1100 block of Cathedral St., is among 50 dispensaries licensed in the state, close to half of the 102 allowed by the Maryland Medical Cannabis Commission. Most of the licensees have opened in recent months after long delays with getting the industry off the ground in Maryland. The General Assembly created the program in 2012. (Balt. Sun)

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Development and density coming to Woodberry?

Now that developer Christopher Mfume has agreed not to demolish two of Woodberry’s historic stone houses to build an apartment building, conversation in the community has broadened to include the implications of dense transit-oriented development along Baltimore’s Jones Falls Valley. “Eighty units, that’s a lot of people to shove into property that used to be two houses. And you expect all these people to use light rail?” asked Judy Finnell, who questioned Mfume’s plan to construct 80 units at the site, incorporating the stone houses into the design. She also questioned the $1,100- to $1,300-a-month rents planned by Mfume during a Woodberry Community Association meeting. (Brew)

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College Park data tech firm raises $20 million in Series B funding round

College Park data technology company Immuta has raised a $20 million Series B round of funding, as it looks to grow its size and customer base. The round was led by Silicon Valley venture capital firm DFJ Growth Management LLC. New investors Dell Technologies Capital and Citi Ventures participated, along with existing investors Drive Capital and Greycroft. Immuta is previously backed by $9.5 million, including an $8 million Series A round that closed early last year. (Balt. Bus. Journal)

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Legg Mason CEO Sullivan's pay rises to $9.7 million

Legg Mason Inc. CEO Joseph A. Sullivan's compensation package increased 8 percent to $9.7 million in fiscal 2018, boosted by incentives tied to the asset manager's performance. Sullivan was paid a $500,000 salary, $4 million cash bonus, $3.32 million in stock awards and $1.66 million in option awards, according to the company's proxy statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on Wednesday. (Balt. Bus. Journal)

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Ellicott City retailer rebounds from flood: 'We’re just going to go back to work and do the best we can'

Tammy Beideman's business, Sweet Elizabeth Jane, lost everything in the flood that ravaged Ellicott City's historic downtown two years ago. Beideman's decision to move her business from lower ground to up the hill on Main Street saved her when flood waters once again rushed through the old mill town on Memorial Day weekend. More than eight inches of rain unleashed a deadly flash flood that took a man's life and destroyed dozens of businesses and residences. (Balt. Bus. Journal)

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